27/04/16

Here I will be looking at a page grid known as a Canon, these are supposed to show the most important parts of the page. The canons of page construction are a set of principles in the field of book design used to describe the ways that page proportions, margins and type areas  also known as print spaces of books are constructed.

A brief history of the canons and their origins are that the notion of canons, or laws of form, of book page construction was popularized by Jan Tschichold in the mid to late twentieth century, based on the work of J. A. van de Graaf, Raúl M. Rosarivo, Hans Kayser, and others. Tschichold wrote, “Though largely forgotten today, methods and rules upon which it is impossible to improve have been developed for centuries. To produce perfect books these rules have to be brought to life and applied.” Kayser’s 1946 Ein harmonikaler Teilungskanon had earlier used the term canon in this context.

Typographers and book designers apply these principles to this day, with variations related to the availability of standardized paper sizes, and the diverse types of commercially printed books.

Ref: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canonsofpageconstruction

So there isn’t just one canon grid there’s four but I am only going to be looking at three as I found the forth wasn’t so much necessary seeing as my page is going to be based on photography instead of typography.

DPS GRID TEMP 2

The one above is known as the medieval manuscript framework according to Tschichold, in which a text area proportioned near the golden ratio is constructed. “Page proportion is 2:3, text area proportioned in the Golden Section.”Building on Rosarivo’s work, contemporary experts in book design such as Jan Tschichold and Richard Hendel assert as well that the page proportion of the golden section (21:34) has been used in book design, in manuscripts, and incunabula, mostly in those produced between 1550 and 1770. Hendel writes that since Gutenberg’s time, books have been most often printed in an upright position, that conform loosely, if not precisely, to the golden ratio.

ref: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canons_golden_section

DPS GRID TEMP 3

This one is known as the Van de Graaf Canon which he had devised this construction to show how Gutenberg and others may have divided their page to achieve margins of one-ninth and two-ninths and a type area in the same proportions as the page.

DPS GRID TEMP

Tschichold’s “golden” canon of page construction here illustrated by a synthesis of Tschichold’s figure thereof, with the diagonals and circle, combined with Rosarivo’s construction by division of the page into ninths. These two constructions rely on the 2:3 page ratio to give a type area height equal to page width as demonstrated by the circle, and result in margin proportions 2:3:4:6. For other page ratios, Rosarivo’s method of ninths is equivalent to van de Graaf’s canon, as Tschichold observed.

Ref: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canons_of_page_construction

I’ve decided to see if these grids made a little sense with a couple of my inspirational dps’s from my previous post, below are the the results.

DPS GRID EXAMPLEDPS GRID EXAMPLE 2DPS GRID EXAMPLE 3DPS GRID EXAMPLE 4DPS GRID EXAMPLE 5DPS GRID EXAMPLE 6

Here I could kind of see how pages work from the pages though I feel that photography pages aren’t really known for using the templates as the layout of the page does not match with the grid so well as to other pages shown below though researching this has given me a greater understanding to the secret law of page harmony.

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